Tag Archives: Australian

1950’s Vynex Sample Book

Super lucky to of found this amazing sample book of vinyl upholstery for transport and upholstery trades just last week.

Mid Century upholstery
Great selection!

Dating from the 1950’s the book contains 60+ samples of vinyl showcasing different textures, patterns, colours and finishes.

Vnyex Sample Book
Nice blurb

See just a small selection below.

Vynex colour samples
How good!

It’s amazing to recognise so many of the patterns and colours from the book on different pieces of furniture I’ve dealt with over the last 10+ years. However I must say my favourite was towards the rear of the book, and appears to of been a late inclusion as it is fixed differently to the other samples.

1950's Vynex Sample Book
Mid Century Madness!

As you can see, this finish is called ‘Satellite’ and definitely has a strong atomic influence. Reminds me very much of those 1950’s French coat/cloth/hat racks by Roger Feraud.

Scrap Metal

Welcome to 2017! (Although 6 weeks late………)

I thought I’d start off the year by sharing a little personal project around the house that I’ve recently completed as it fits in perfectly with our ideals, which is saving items from the 20th Century and giving them another lease on life!

You see, we’ve got a small drop off just outside our back veranda, and with a new little woofer on the way I was after a small bit of fencing to stop him getting into bad habits of jumping/falling off the edge.

So one day whilst browsing a scrap metal/recycle yard I came across this great little section of 1960’s fencing (love this design!). As soon as I saw it I knew I had the perfect spot for it so after exchanging a $10 note home it came to get measured up.

Rusty gold *puke
Ready for the scrap heap……

After a few small modifications (few brackets added to mount in its new position) the tedious task of removing the old paint, cleaning, then undercoating was here. After a few enjoyable hours it was now ready to be positioned and fixed into place.

Geometric mid century fencing design
Time consuming to do correctly!

Once mounted, I then completed the job by applying 2 coats of an exterior paint (woodland grey) to match our window frames. Although the colours slightly differ to 50 years ago they still work extremely well with it’s design (let’s be honest – any colour would look good on it!)

Triangles 1960's Pattern
Super Happy!

So there you have it folks, a great piece of 1960’s design fencing, a $10 note, some elbow grease and paint makes for a job well done whilst adhering to our status quo.

Summertone Bedside – Part 2

At the end of my last update I had removed the base/legs and was continuing to prepare the bedside for it’s new finish.

1950's bedside restoration
Sorry about the shadows!

With the bedside now in pieces I could get stuck into some fine veneer repairs along with the final preparation of the timber surfaces before reassembly.  As mentioned previously due to the thin nature of the veneer, patience is a must when sanding,  240 grit to start, 320 grit to finish.

Prepped and ready to go
Getting there

Reassembly was pretty straight forward, fresh wood glue, and with the existing screws and holes all lining up it went back together like a jigsaw puzzle, just lucky I numbered each piece!

Mid Century Bedside
Sanded, assembled and ready for a new finish

Once the glue had dried, a very light final sand with some 400 grit wet and dry was carried out in preparation for the Danish Oil to be applied.

Next up – the finished product!

Killer Kitchen Chairs!

After a little too long between posts, I’ve returned to share a nice little save from a local recycle centre over the weekend. The acute angled legs instantly caught my attention, and after a brief inspection (more so to see if their missing pal # 4 was floating about somewhere else – but to no avail!) I loaded them up and away I went.

1950's Australian Dining Chairs
0, 45, 90.

They definitely look familiar, and I’m sure I’ve spotted them somewhere online (either for sale or in an old furniture catalogue) however at this moment they remain unidentified.

Mid Century Modern Chair
Strengthening brace – weakening style…..

From the images you can probably see that added support from the front to back legs on either side that looks out of place. It’s definitely a later addition, and after a quick hit with the heat gun to remove those multiple layers of paint you can see the difference in timbers used. The angled leg (and rest of the chair) is a beautiful Queensland maple, whilst the support appears to be a pine, possibly Kauri looking at the grain. It’ll be removed in due time when tackling a full blown restoration on all 3. Not for the faint hearted, and definitely lots of work, but the finished product will be worth it.

1950's kitchen chair
Ones original, ones not!

Holiday TV Lamp!

I recently picked up this beautiful little TV lamp whilst on holidays. After spotting it in a local retro/vintage shop I knew it had to be mine, so after exchanging some currency it was packed away in my suitcase and safely made the 2500km trip home with me.

I definitely didn’t appreciate just how amazing the projection of light is from this little lamp. It shoots a really crisp line of light illuminating everything below the shade, whilst casting a shadow above.

Australian TV lamp 1950's
Tripod Legs! Always a favourite.

Along with it’s crisp line lighting ability, we have the simple yet always amazing ‘tripod’ base which is just so cool.

1950's TV Lamp Australian
Unmasked from the darkness!

The top hat (shade) is another impressive piece of design, which looks to be floating above the lamp itself when illuminated, almost like a UFO! Combined with the tripod base the proportions of this TV lamp for mine makes it one of the best I’ve seen.

This one’s a keeper for sure.

1950’s Bedside Repairs

I came across this neat little set of bedside tables on the weekend. Ever popular, and judging by the style, I’d imagine they date from the 1950’s. Cube shaped, and sitting atop a 4 legged base, the compartments comprise of a single drawer and cupboard space.

Mid Century Bedsides
45 degree chamfered edges

It looks like they’ve previously had a refurbish, and unfortunately the handle choice leaves a little………or a lot to be desired! Just not the correct style for the piece. Luckily I was able to find 4 period specific matching handles that should look quite good. More on those next post.

Mid Century Australian Bedside tables.
Super fine cut and paste!

Now for the fun part. The current handles had to have 2 extra holes drilled in each drawer, and 1 extra in each cupboard door because the centres for the screw holes were wider apart than the original handles (6 holes in total to patch). Secondly, whilst removing the handles, they removed some of the finish and stain due to whatever glue they used to attach them. Double Whammy! Thanks for coming! LOL.  All good, I’ll sort it!

I started off by glueing some 6mm dowel pieces in place of the old handle screw holes. This will help give a solid backing to the small pieces of maple veneer I’ll cut and paste. A super sharp razor blade and small rule then helped to size the veneer up perfectly which was ‘borrowed’ from the rear/bottom of the drawer fascia. It should mean that once I’ve reapplied some stain, it will match very well. Fingers crossed of course!

More progress next blog post!

ATEL Furniture

What do I love more than great quality mid century furniture? Catalogues for said furniture! It’s always great to come across an original piece of advertising, which happened when I came into possession of an ATEL wall unit a few weeks ago. The unit is currently dismantled and stacked atop of my car in the shed, however tonight I thought I’d share a few images of the ‘Personal Plan Series’ unit chart and model calculator as the ATEL wall units have been a topic of discussion in a few social media groups over the past few weeks so thought it would be fitting!

Mid Century Wall Units
ATEL unit chart and model calculator!
Australian Mid Century Wall Units
120 different options!

As you can see from the above picture, this brochure listed 120 varying cabinet/shelving units that you could mix and match to produce the wall unit of your desire! Another really great feature is that all the prices are listed below, giving an accurate cost of each unit.

The unit that came with this brochure was 10 ft wide, and 2 units tall, and cost $361 in the early 1960’s. According to the bureau of statistics, the average male wage at the same time was between $30 – $40 a week. Do the math, these were not cheap units!

I thought I’d finish off by posting an image of one ATEL unit currently for sale on Gumtree for appreciation.  Beautiful! Now just to find a wall big enough!

1960's Wall Unit
Huge amounts of storage!

 

Kafka Lounge

I thought the best way to start off 2016 on the blog (a little late…….yes I know) would be to wrap up the Kafka lounge blog posts that I started last year in the lead up to our wedding – you can find them here.

In my last post I left with you with the finishing touches in preparation to use the lounge as a ‘love seat’ on the amazingly white sands of Jervis Bay.

So how did it all turn out you may ask? Excellent! See below!

Kafka Lounge

Now it wouldn’t be fair If I didn’t show off my beautiful bride on the day…………..

Mid Century, Wedding, Kafka, Australian
Concept delivered perfectly!

It was amazing to see the concept that I had pictured for all those months leading up to the wedding be captured on film by our wonderfully talented photographer – Pete, from Peter Izzard Photography. I cannot recommend him enough! You can find out more about his services here  – http://www.peterizzardphotography.com.au/

Until next time!

Meyer Furniture

Meyer Furniture, not Myer. Got it? Good!

Mid Century Australian
Not a bad stance.

This chair is interesting to me. Why? Well because of its construction. From the front it appears to be your typical steel/iron rod chair. However once you see the underside you quickly realise that the frame isn’t welded together. It is in fact bolted together using various  clamps and fasteners. These hold the timber armrests (covered in plastic) / the back support and the seat all together (see photo below).

Mid Century Dining Chair
Early ‘Flat Pack’?

It really is quite amazing, and I would imagine of been more time consuming in the final assembly stage. I am curious why a company would go away from the traditional method of say, welding the frame together to the method described above?

Now I’m only speculating, but one reason I can think of is space saving for transport, just like Ikea’s flat pack furniture. You may of been able to fit say 20 of Meyer’s fully assembled chairs in the back of a delivery van, you break them down and that number could probably triple or quadruple quite easily. Another would be the ease of manufacture of each separate part off the production line.

So just who are ‘Meyer Furniture’? Searching on-line wasn’t a great deal of help, however trove brought up limited results. One was a news article from the 25th of September 1958 which read  –

The Sydney firm of Meyer Furniture successfully tendered for the supply and delivery of steel framed cafeteria furniture for the cafeteria to be located on the fourth floor of the new administrative Building at Parkes. The furniture comprises 90 tables, and 360 chairs, and deliveries are to be completed by November 17. The accepted tender price is £2,593.  

Another was a great image of their furniture stand at the 1960 Furniture Exhibition from the NSW State Library website – which I’m pretty sure shows the exact chair up against the rear wall.

http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemLarge.aspx?itemID=80339
Meyer Furniture Stand 1960

Unfortunately that’s all the info I can find right now, however as with most things the search never stops, it just gets put on ‘hold’ until some new information/pictures/furniture comes to light!